Support SLFS here or join the Red Carpet Club here. | Summer Showdown begins May 31. Get tickets now.

Māsima: Pacific Islands Film Tour

May 17 - May 23

Māsima: Pacific Islands Film Tour kicks off on Friday, May 17th, with an exciting lineup that highlights acclaimed filmmakers and emerging voices from the Pacific Islander community.

These films, touching on incredible stories of connection, traditions, resistance and much more, are curated and presented by Salt Lake Film Society, Utah Pacific Islands Knowledge 2 Action Resource and Utah Pacific Islands Film Series.

Māsima 2024 is part of our annual Cultural Tours, a decade long celebration of history, culture, diversity and heritage of Utah communities.

PANELS

Available Free May 17 - May 23

Māsima 2024 Panel Conversations: Guided by our amazing moderator, Kamaile Tripp-Harris, our Māsima 2024 panel conversations are a true celebration of Pacific Islanders diversity as well as educational experiences that help create awareness and cultural connections within Pasifika filmmakers all around the world.

These FREE pre-recorded panels will be available online soon. Available thru May 24.

Children of the Diaspora Shorts Program

Panelists:
Toa Takitini – Caitlin Head
Find Where I Belong – Kahu Kaiha
Teine – Giselle Ilaoa

Moderator: Kamaile Tripp

Join this group of three unapologetic filmmakers who discuss the fine balance between representing the diversity in Pasifika cultures and creating universally relatable films, while they remain authentic, honor their inspirations and confront their own believes and patterns.


Documentary Shorts Program

Panelists:
In Exile – Nathan Fitch
Islandtrification – Lani Cupchoy
Trenton: To The Moon & Back – Josh Leong
Ultimate Citizens – Francine Strickwerda

Moderator: Kamaile Tripp-Harris

A sneak peak on how these talented filmmakers engaged with such unique stories through the narrative of documentary and the challenges navigating representation, collaboration and community trust.

ADMISSIONS

INDIVIDUAL FILM TICKETS
$12 per film screening
 
PASSES
$60 All Access Pass includes access to all Māsima 2024 in person films and events.
 
All tickets and film passes are available at SLFStix.org.

FILM SCHEDULE

In theater screenings start Friday May 17.  Selected films are available virtually now.

Fri May 17

7 PM

Made in Utah Shorts Program: 

The Good Lie

9 min 13 sec

+

Pioneers of Aloha

11 min 11 sec

+

Adrift

4 min 57 sec

+

The Ali’i King

26 min 39 sec

Screening run time: 52 min.

8 PM

Cast and Crew Q&A

Sat May 18

7 PM

Documentaries Shorts Program:

Hounga’ia – Be Grateful

3 min 57 sec

+

Ultimate Citizens

39 min

+

Trenton: To The Moon & Back

17 min

+

Islandtrification

8 min 35 sec

+

In Exile 10 min

+

Kava ‘o Aotearoa

8 min 45 sec

+

Son of Samoa

11 min

Screening run time: 1 hr 38 min.

Sun May 19

7 PM

Children of the Diaspora Shorts Program:

Toa Takitini

11 min 53 sec

+

Teine

11 min

+

Find Where I Belong

13 min 43 sec

+

Hafekasi 

16 min

Screening run time: 52 min 36 sec

Mon May 20

7 PM

Feature in Focus:

Sir Sofele

1 hr 18 min

Screening run time: 1 hr 18 min.

Tues May 21

7 PM

History and Myths Program:

Kūkini

26 min 01 sec

+

Tala

51 min 45 sec

Screening run time: 1 hr 18 min.

Wed May 22

7 PM

Island Humor Shorts Program:

Jone Wise

22 min 27 sec

+

The Good Thief

4 min 58 sec

+

Ripe For Change

11 min 49 sec

7:40 PM

Pacific Possibilities Shorts Program:

Vakaraitaka

14 min 34 sec

+

Crying on the I-5

13 min 24 sec

+

Kai Hali’a (Sea of Memory)

8 min 30 sec 

Screening run time: 1 hr 17 min

Thurs May 23

7 PM

Feature in Focus:

Pacific Mother  

1 hr 30 min

Screening run time: 1 hr 30 min.

8:30 PM

In-person Panel Conversation

 

FILMS AND SHORTS

Listed alphabetical by title.  

ADRIFT

FRIDAY, MAY 17 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF MADE IN UTAH SHORTS PROGRAM ON FRIDAY MAY 17

5 min | 2023 | USA | Not Rated | English | Short
Directed by Kā’eo Drumright
After a late night out, a young Tongan man finds connection in an unexpected place.

CRYING ON THE I-5

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22 | 7:40 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF PACIFIC POSSIBILITIES PROGRAM ON WEDNESDAY MAY 22

13 min | 2024 | USA | Not Rated | English | Short

Directed by Jacob Cruz-Rine

After the death of his grandmother, a young Chamoru man ruminates on regrets he has, the relationship he had with his grandmother, and the love he has for his family.

FIND WHERE I BELONG

SUNDAY, MAY 19 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF CHILDREN OF THE DIASPORA SHORTS PROGRAM ON SUNDAY MAY 19

14 min | 2023 | New Zealand | Not Rated | English | Short

Directed by Kahu Kaiha

Life on the streets of New Zealand for two homeless men: John, the older man, seems to like this life and to be at home here. Elvis, the Marquesan, dreams of returning to his island. Good relations and understanding v. confrontation, separation and mutual aid…

HAFEKASI

SUNDAY, MAY 19 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF CHILDREN OF THE DIASPORA SHORTS PROGRAM ON SUNDAY MAY 19

16 min | 2023 | Australia | Not Rated | English, Tongan | Short

Directed by Annelise Hickey

A 10 year old girl begins to realise she’s different to her single, white mum and family. Mother and daughter navigate identity and belonging in ’90s Melbourne suburbia.

HOUNGA'IA - BE GRATEFUL

SATURDAY, MAY 18 | 7 PM
WILL SCREEN AS PART OF DOCUMENTARY SHORTS PROGRAM ON SATURDAY MAY 18
4 min | 2023 | New Zealand | Not Rated | Tongan | Short
Directed by Mele Tupou
It takes a village to raise a child, let alone one living with a disability. Mele show’s us how Haloti’s village wraps around him in support.

IN EXILE

SATURDAY, MAY 18 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF DOCUMENTARY SHORTS PROGRAM ON SATURDAY MAY 18

10 min | 2023 | USA | Not Rated | English, Marshallese | Short

Directed by Nathan Fitch

IN EXILE is a short film that explores the US nuclear legacy in the Pacific through the lens of members of the Marshallese community in Springdale Arkansas who gather each year to commemorate the bombing of Bikini Atoll in 1946.

ISLANDTRIFICATION

SATURDAY, MAY 18 | 7 PM
WILL SCREEN AS PART OF DOCUMENTARY SHORTS PROGRAM ON SATURDAY MAY 18

8 min | 2023 | USA | Not Rated | English | Short

Directed by Lani Cupchoy

Islandtrification documents the journey of Kānaka Maoli families resisting predatory gentrification on Maui, Hawaii, which has a deep history of displacing locals due to economic development-agribusiness and remains the prime spot for the world elite to build their multimillion-dollar estates.

JONE WISE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF ISLAND HUMOR PROGRAM ON WEDNESDAY MAY 22

22 min | 2023 | Fiji | Not Rated | English | Short

Directed by Tumeli Tuqota

When someone steals his precious flip flops, Jone Wise must return to his old ways of Grog Combat and battle his way through adversity, tribulation and high tide takis to retrieve what is rightfully his.

KAI HALI'A (SEA OF MEMORY)

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22 | 7:40 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF PACIFIC POSSIBILITIES PROGRAM ON WEDNESDAY MAY 22

8 min | 2023 | USA | Not Rated | English, Hawaiian | Short

Directed by Angelique Kalani Axelrode

In the abstract realm of memory, a diasporic Kānaka struggles to connect with their family and lover. By engaging with their moʻokūʻauhau (genealogy) and calling on their kūpuna (ancestors) and ke kai (ocean), they are able to reconnect to themselves. Seeing memory as an intricate ʻupena (net) of both intangible and tangible threads of reality, intertwined with visceral feelings that intimately connect us with our kūpuna (ancestors) and the ʻāina (land), the art of remembering brings us back to our core.

KAVA 'O AOTEAROA

SATURDAY, MAY 18 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF DOCUMENTARY SHORTS PROGRAM ON SATURDAY MAY 18

9 min | 2022 | New Zealand | Not Rated | English | Short

Directed by Joshua Baker

A collective of Pasifika cultural guardians reactivate the ancient Tu’i Tonga kava ceremony for contemporary use in Aotearoa-New Zealand in a way that honours tangata whenua (indigenous people).

KŪKINI

TUESDAY, MAY 21 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF HISTORY AND MYTHS PROGRAM ON TUESDAY MAY 21

26 min | 2023 | USA | Not Rated | Hawaiian(‘olelo Hawai‘i) | Short

Directed by Mitchel Merrick

In 1790 Hawaiʻi, an elite warrior must leave his family behind when sent on a deadly mission to report on the bloody war waged by Kamehameha against Maui. When captured by the enemy, he is miraculously saved by someone who has a message for him of their own.

PACIFIC MOTHER

THURSDAY, MAY 23 | 7:00 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF FEATURE FOCUS ON THURSDAY MAY 23

2023 | Hawai’i, New Zealand, Polynesia, Micronesia, Tahiti, Cook Islands, Okinawa | Not Rated | English, Hawaiian | Feature

Directed by Katherine McRae, Migawa Ozawa

When freedivers Sachiko Fukumoto and William Trubridge were denied the natural water-birth they wanted in Okinawa, they traveled to New Zealand where they were supported in their choice. Now Sachiko seeks out three other mothers around the Pacific and discovers they face similar battles and have been cut off from the maternity traditions of their past. Sachiko becomes convinced that when mothers are supported emotionally, physically and culturally, they are more likely to have a positive birth experience, wherever it takes place. Aware of the importance of the ocean in all aspects of their lives, these Pacific women link the protection of our oceans with the protection of their children and seek a future where we live in harmony with nature. As Sachiko and William prepare for the birth of their second child, they are determined to show their daughter that supporting parents’ birth choice grows healthier babies, families and communities.

PIONEERS OF ALOHA

FRIDAY, MAY 17 | 7 PM
WILL SCREEN AS PART OF MADE IN UTAH SHORTS PROGRAM ON FRIDAY MAY 17
11 min | 2024 | USA | Not Rated | English | Short
In Skull Valley, Utah, a former settlement of Hawaiian LDS pioneers stands preserved as a memorial and gathering place. The women of this community are dedicated to preserving its unique history and dispelling lingering myths. The land holds a captivating story, attracting Polynesian pioneers over a century ago and paving the way for a fast-growing community.

RIPE FOR CHANGE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF ISLAND HUMOR PROGRAM ON WEDNESDAY MAY 22

12 min | 2024 | Australia | Not Rated | English | Short

Directed by Alisha Joy Higgins

“In the quirky world of ‘Ripe for Change,’ a group of diverse individuals find themselves entangled in a series of bizarre body swaps after indulging in a mysterious fruit at a remote market stall. As they navigate this hilariously twisted dark comedy adventure, one of them becomes increasingly suspicious of whether this phenomenon is just a bizarre side effect of the weed they smoked earlier or something much fruitier. Fueled by curiosity and comedy, ‘Ripe for Change’ is a zany journey that unravels the mysteries behind these extraordinary body transformations and leaves the audience questioning the true cause.”

SIR SOFELE

MONDAY, MAY 20 | 7 PM

78 min | 2022 | Kingdom of Tonga | Not Rated | English, Tongan | Feature

Directed by Neka ‘Aipolo

Experience the story of the Polynesian composer knighted by Pope John Paul II in a feature length documentary that follows his life, music and the peoples impacted along the way.

SON OF SAMOA

SATURDAY, MAY 18 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF DOCUMENTARY SHORTS PROGRAM ON SATURDAY MAY 18

11 min | 2023 | New Zealand | Not Rated | English, Samoan | Short

Directed by Laman Time

Son of Samoa takes you through the journey of Tatau. Identity is explored in a way physically, spiritually and mentally that most have not endured. In this short documentary director Laman discusses his disconnection from family, community and wavering relationship with himself with supporting voices, Tamoko/Tufuga artist Inia Taylor, speaks on the importance of belonging and how to navigate that through cultural traditions. Bonni Tamati, a Pacific art advocate also expresses her love for self-discovery and how love within oneself can help spread love around you. This is a story of hope, a story shared for all, a story of self-love.

TALA

TUESDAY, MAY 21 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF HISTORY AND MYTHS PROGRAM ON TUESDAY MAY 21

51 min | 2022 | USA | Not Rated | English, Samoan | Feature

Directed by Milton Randell Kaka

A young samoan family has just found a new religion, the villages aren’t to pleased so a few men go to the family’s house and take the 5 month old baby. The family faces a tragedy which the mother struggles with for years. Years later the man responsible for taking baby Tala comes to ask for forgiveness from the family. Based on a true story.

TEINE

SUNDAY, MAY 19 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF CHILDREN OF THE DIASPORA SHORTS PROGRAM ON SUNDAY MAY 19

11 min | 2023 | New Zealand | Not Rated | English, Samoan | Short

Directed by Giselle Ilaoa

A poignant story of a dutiful eldest daughter within a Samoan household and her internal struggle of the weight of her responsibilities and expectations from her family, as well as, trying to maintain a grasp on her own aspirations in life.

THE ALI'I KING

FRIDAY, MAY 17 | 7 PM
WILL SCREEN AS PART OF MADE IN UTAH SHORTS PROGRAM ON FRIDAY MAY 17

26 min | 2024 | USA | Not Rated | English, German, Hawaiian(‘olelo Hawai‘i) | Short

Directed by Christine Kunewa Walker

Set in the 1960’s, a Mormon family of Hawaiian German immigrants embark on a road trip through the Utah desert to attend the opening of Tikiland, a new Disneyland attraction. Along the way, family tensions heat up as the road to “the happiest place on earth” leads to painful revelations about the cultural and emotional complexities that jeopardize the family dynamic.

THE GOOD LIE

FRIDAY, MAY 17 | 7 PM
WILL SCREEN AS PART OF MADE IN UTAH SHORTS PROGRAM ON FRIDAY MAY 17
9 min | 2023 | USA | Not Rated | English | Short
Directed by Aarron Reupena
A burglar stumbles upon a house with a dead body inside, but what seems to be an easy target soon turns into something much more meaningful.

THE GOOD THIEF

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF ISLAND HUMOR PROGRAM ON WEDNESDAY MAY 22

5 min | 2023 | New Zealand | Not Rated | English | Short

Directed by Marius Leituala

TOA TAKITINI

SUNDAY, MAY 19 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF CHILDREN OF THE DIASPORA SHORTS PROGRAM ON SUNDAY MAY 19

12 min | 2023 | New Zealand | Not Rated | English, Maori | Short

Directed by Caitlin Head

Two siblings find themselves in their fathers room a year after his drowning. Stuck there by Hine-nui-te-pō (the Goddess of Death), the two must face their traumas of his death, grief and mend their broken relationship.

TRENTON: TO THE MOON AND BACK

SATURDAY, MAY 18 | 7 PM
WILL SCREEN AS PART OF DOCUMENTARY SHORTS PROGRAM ON SATURDAY MAY 18

17 min | 2022 | USA | Not Rated | English | Short

Directed by Josh Leong

Two indigenous brothers from the Solomon Islands escape a cult posing as a leadership training organization, finding refuge in a small, conservative town in rural Georgia.

ULTIMATE CITIZENS

SATURDAY, MAY 18 | 7 PM
WILL SCREEN AS PART OF DOCUMENTARY SHORTS PROGRAM ON SATURDAY MAY 18

39 min | 2023 | USA | Not Rated | English | Short

Directed by Francine Strickwerda

In ULTIMATE CITIZENS, Jamshid is an Iranian who came to study in 1970’s America, and due to the Revolution, never went “home.” As a guidance counselor in Seattle Public Schools, Jamshid’s best work takes place out of the building and on a playing field with “his kids,” the children of refugees and immigrants. Their parents are in the grips of their own struggles to make a living and a home in a strange land. Mr. Jamshid is the charismatic, fiery, funny human with a Frisbee in hand, who is the first to show that “love wins” on the field, off the field, at home with family, or boldly forging a new community, in a new country – one kid, chicken, extreme mile and friend at a time.

VAKARAITAKA

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22 | 7:40 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF PACIFIC POSSIBILITIES PROGRAM ON WEDNESDAY MAY 22

14 min | 2022 | Fiji | Not Rated | English | Short

Directed by Fenton Bose Lutunatabua

The recent swells of climate activism in the Pacific are inherently linked with the deep connections of past and future generations. Rising up to physical and existential struggles requires tapping into ancestral wisdom that can further strengthen our existing bonds with one another. In this four-part cinematic poem, Fijian storyteller Fenton Lutunatabua utilizes landscape, dance, and language to call people into this work, as well as offer a balm to the losses faced.

In The Can with Doug Fabrizio starts April 20

Salt Lake Film Society partners with University of Utah department of Film and Media Arts and KUER’s RadioWest host Doug Fabrizio to bring you a conversation about THE ROYAL TENENBAUMS. This month’s special guest will be University of Utah Associate Professor of Film Studies Sarah Sinwell. Admission includes a screening of the film followed by a live panel discussion.

Join us for this one night only special event! Tickets are now available here.

Anderson and Anderson in April 2023

Join us at SLFS in April 2023 for a retrospective series featuring the films of P.T. Anderson and Wes Anderson every weekend on Friday and Saturday starting March 31st.

Paul Thomas Anderson (known as P.T.) grew up in the San Fernando Valley in the ’70s and 80’s. At an early age, he decided that directing was all he wanted to do and started making short films with his friends. As a senior in high school he wrote, produced, and directed a 30 minute short film “The Dirk Diggler Story”. (This became the basis for his film Boogie Nights.) While at the Sundance Feature Film program he developed the film “Sydney” which became the acclaimed film Hard Eight. After struggles with his distributor, he took his own version of “Sydney” to Cannes where it screened in the Un Certain Regard section. Eventually “Sydney” was released as Hard Eight in 1996, of which film critic Roger Ebert wrote “Movies like Hard Eight remind me of what original, compelling characters the movies can sometimes give us.”

Wes Anderson was born in Houston, Texas in 1969. Also at a young age he was driven to become a filmmaker making silent films with his brothers and friends. Later working as a projectionist at the University of Texas at Austin he met writer/actor Owen Wilson who he collaborated with in his early films such as Bottle Rocket. His signature post-modern style and subversion of main-stream storytelling stands out amidst commercial filmmaking today. Big star-studded casts, fast paced humor, and a nostalgia mark his films which are never quite what you expected.

These popular directors, who happen to share a last name, represent a new wave of stylistic directing that always surprises. Their way of telling stories is unique in a world of short attention spans and easy endings.

Showtimes may vary. Tickets will be on sale at www.slfstix.org.

Mar 31: The Fantastic Mr. Fox

April 1: Boogie Nights

April 7: Punch Drunk Love

April 8: The Grand Budapest Hotel

April 14: Hard Eight

April 15: Bottle Rocket

April 21: There Will Be Blood

April 22: The Royal Tenenbaums

April 28: Magnolia

April 29: Rushmore

Schedule for Anderson and Anderson in April 2023 with a scene from Punch Drunk Love.

SLFS Staff: The Crowd, The Audience, and White Noise

At Salt Lake Film Society, we take a lot of pride in providing access to the movie theater experience. For many films and visual stories, the very nature of their production and exhibition is designed to be watched on the big screen, shared in a movie theater with others. In our blog this week, we hear from Landon Adams, Theater Manager at Broadway Centre Cinemas, and how his experience watching White Noise was enhanced through the movie theater experience.


“Watching a film in a theater is a profound sensory experience. We become entranced by both the screen in front of us, and the audience surrounding us. In Noah Baumbach’s White Noise, characters speak of the supermarket as a spiritual haven, a temple broadcasting soothing psychic data composed of words, images, colors and sounds. The cinema’s function is the very same. 

Adams, standing in front of the White Noise poster and posing somewhat similarly to Jack Gladney (Adam Driver)

The plot of the film concerns the exploits of the blended Gladney family. The main protagonist, J.A.K. Gladney (played by Adam Driver), is a professor of Hitler studies, who in an early scene waxes poetically to a group of wide-eyed college students about the allure of the crowd. They hang onto his every word on topics ranging from “deathward” plots, to mob mentality and the power of the collective. Their awe feeds into Jack’s sense of immortality in an unwitting ritual that summons the dark cloud of Jack’s tentative demise and sets the wheels of our story in motion.

It’s in the aforementioned lecture that Jack, pointing out into the lecture hall, singles out a terrified student as a member of the future dead. We see this moment in a POV shot, from the viewpoint of the student. Jack Gladney points directly into the camera, pointing at both the student, and projected overhead on a 45 foot screen, pointing into the theater at us. If we were watching this on TV, we might miss that throughout the film Jack is aware of us, speaks to us, asking us in states between wakefulness and dreaming, “Who are you?” So attuned to the crowd, he senses us even when alone in his room in the dead of night.

For the duration of the movie we are invited into various crowded scenes: An overstuffed home, a bustling campus, evacuation camps, supermarkets, even roadways; traffic stretching out past the horizon toward infinity. The characters’ relation to these crowds is ever-shifting. Sometimes they are leaders, sometimes members. They often look to these crowds to measure themselves and source how they should feel, or how they should act. They find comfort in crowds, a sense of subconscious immortality borne out of an esoteric reinforcement, the comfort from “the collective”.

The film opens with a monologue over a montage of car crash stunts. The monologue asserts that these crashes are a highlight reel, representing innovation and optimism. This opening contextualizes what happens later in the film while Jack is driving down the highway. In the midst of a crisis our cast witnesses an accident, or at least the children do. When it happens, Jack is looking away.

Again we see the action as a POV shot, this time inhabiting the viewpoint of Jack’s children. A car rushes into the frame, overturning in a blink-and-you-miss-it moment, and when it occurs, Jack is looking away, into the camera, as if watching for  our reaction, to determine from us, the audience, how he should feel.

A still from the film White Noise, a movie shown at the Broadway theater in SLC
A variety of shots in White Noise achieve their true visual and communicative power only when seen on a 45-foot screen in a dark room with strangers.

The movie theater provides a communal experience, often complex and of multi-dimensions. We gather under the flashing lights of the big screen and allow ourselves to sink into the story, letting our  worries fall away across a paltry runtime. Sharing this with an audience makes the spell all the more potent. The people surrounding us help transform the experience by virtue of their presence and individual experiences.

It’s these fellow movie-goers, these crowds of eager enthusiasts, who  breathe life into a film, and ground us in the experience. It’s our physical presence with others that creates and completes this unwitting ritual, just as in the film. Acting as kindred travelers on the cinematic highway, we escape down reality’s off-ramp toward the open-road comfort of the surreal, where together we are immortal beneath the silver screen of the theater.”


Thank You And a Happy New Year From SLFS

2022 Is Nearly Gone, But The Memories Live On

Hello independent film fanatics, and congratulations on making it through another year! As we all worked our hardest to make it through the days, months, and year of 2022 whole, many of us found support and solace in film, and the incredible visual stories that we are engaged in. Whether exploring the multiverse to appreciate the true value of life and kindness in Everything Everywhere All at Once, or enjoying a quirky couple’s love for volcanoes and each other in Fire of Love, or learning more about those who are hearing-impaired and the beautiful burden of family in CODA, we have screened many beautiful and breathtaking stories at the Broadway in 2022.

EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE ALL AT ONCE
FIRE OF LOVE
CODA
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Perhaps you got one of the last tickets to a Rocky Horror Picture Show accompanied by live performers, or maybe you were the only one in the theater to see a captivating, foreign independent film on a Tuesday afternoon; Salt Lake Film Society is proud and privileged to exhibit all kinds of incredible stories for the Salt Lake City community, all supported by dedicated patrons like you.

Supporting Independent Film in 2023 With SLFS

If you’ve enjoyed your experiences at the Broadway, and if you value the type and quality of films you see with SLFS, please consider supporting us! Join the Red Carpet Club, or make a donation online right now at SLFS.org, or at the theater the next time you see a film; even better, make a donation before Sunday and reduce your taxable income for the coming year! Every dollar supports our mission to exhibit, engage, and educate the Salt Lake City community through independent film. We couldn’t do it without you.

a photo of some the SLFS staff and board in their office in downtown Salt Lake City

 

Some the SLFS staff and board members at the SLFS office

From our Salt Lake Film Society family to yours, thank you for engaging with diverse stories and supporting independent cinema in Salt Lake City, and we look forward to seeing you all in 2023!


SLFS Staff: Holiday Picks 2022

In Salt Lake City, the holiday season is a time of joy, compassion, and nostalgia. Whether you are spending time with family and friends, or  enjoying the snowy slopes and warm drinks, this time of year is about loving traditions and memories as well as making new ones. Whether it’s the holiday movie you watched every year as a family, or going out to your local theater on Christmas Day, film has a special place in many of our hearts during this festive period. 

At Salt Lake Film Society, our staff also have a special place for movies in their hearts during the holiday season. From all-time holiday classics, to obscure independent films, to the never-ending debate on whether or not Die Hard is a Christmas movie, our love of film and cinema doesn’t take time off for the holidays. Check out the wide variety of picks and preferences that SLFS  staff enjoy during this time of year and who knows, maybe you will find a new title to add to your family holiday movie tradition!

TOKYO GODFATHERS (2003)Tori Baker, President/CEO

    • “Consider starting a tradition of viewing the masterwork Tokyo Godfathers, a tale that will take you on a sentimental journey that might just also break your heart in the best way possible—the way that makes you want to pursue more understanding of humanity and it’s complexities.”

AUNTIE MAME (1958) – Marcie Collett, Associate Director of Development

    • “During holidays – or whenever I’m in need of inspiration on abundance and fabulousness – I treat myself to Rosalind Russell in Auntie Mame. Mame’s memoir is Live, Live, Live!, and her motto is: “Life is a banquet, and most poor suckers are starving.”

a still of gremlins caroling from the holiday movie Gremlins
GREMLINS (1984) is actually a Christmas movie, complete with Gremlin carolers!

GREMLINS (1984) – Rachel Getts, Associate Director of Digital Content 

    • “A classic funny alternative holiday movie that doesn’t take itself too seriously.  The gremlin bar scene alone is a bizarre surreal hilarious mess. Wouldn’t change a thing.”

SCROOGED (1988) – Stephen Simmons, Associate Director of Production

    • “I watch this film every year. It never gets old. It’s got everything. The cast is a 90’s comedy dream team. It’s spooky, sarcastic and filled with Christmas spirit(s). The speech Frank Cross (Murray) gives at the end makes me tear up…..every damn time.”

CAROL (2015) – Ally Lantz, Theater Operations Manager

    • “One of my favorite films that is altogether beautiful and heartbreaking (and also happens to have a Christmas road trip involved). In other words, be sad, do gay, and Merry Christmas.”

A PISTOL FOR RINGO (1965) – Landon Adams, Theater Operations Manager

    • “Have you ever watched a spaghetti western and thought “This would be improved with a Christmas theme?” Well A PISTOL FOR RINGO exists anyway. It opens with two men meeting in the center of town at high noon, hands near their gun belts. One moves fast, offering his hand: “Merry Christmas, Jack”.”

RECKLESS (1995) – Brandon Suisse,  Associate Director of Development

    • “A bizarre and largely forgotten dark comedy for anyone who has ever been overwhelmed by the relentless giddiness of the holiday season. While the satire may not feel scalding (or coherent) enough for some, it ultimately arrives somewhere that’s unexpectedly un-pessimistic. This unpolished gem of a movie is a must-see for Grinches everywhere–if you can find a copy.”

IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE (1946) – Jesse Sindelar, Development Manager

    • “An established holiday tradition for many, it’s also the blueprint for most holiday movie storylines: not appreciating what you have until it’s gone. I’ve cried at the end of every watch, and I’ll keep on crying in the future. Merry Christmas you wonderful old Building and Loan!”

SLEEPER (1973) – Susan Tive, Head of Development

    • “As a child, my Jewish family’s Christmas tradition was dinner at a Chinese restaurant followed by a movie. In 1973, it was SLEEPER, Woody Allen’s dystopian comedy which became for me one of those cinematic treasures I summon again and again and when I do, I’m still a kid too young to get the punchlines but not yet too old to delight in the memories of my parents’ laughter.” 

THE FAMILY STONE (2005) – Amy Beth Aste, Head of Theater Operations

    • “The actors alone make me nostalgic, Sarah Jessica Parker, Diane Keaton, Rachel McAdams, Dermot Mulroney, Luke Wilson, Claire Danes, Craig T. Nelson, Paul Schneider, all actors I loved in the 90’s! They come together in one story of a family that deserves your suspension of disbelief and will make you laugh, cry, and want to learn sign language.”

TANGERINE (2015) – Daniel de Santiago,  Front of House Staff

    • “My love for this holiday film goes not just towards its hilarious dialogue, but how the film was captured. Sean Baker is amazing in how he documents his scenes, they feel more like a documentary then a scripted film, it’s excellent directing. Plus, the first line in this film is “Merry Christmas B***H”.”

POLAR EXPRESS (2014) – Sophie Nielsen,  Front of House Staff

    • “All aboard, and hold on TIGHTLY! I make my family watch POLAR EXPRESS every Christmas. Everything about it is magical: the scenery, the music, the friendship, the actual magic, and the fact that they only had to hire one voice actor (Tom Hanks).”

a still of Olivia Hussey in Black Christmas, a holiday slasher from 1974
Olivia Hussey in Black Christmas (1974)

 

BLACK CHRISTMAS (1974) – Patrick Charles, Theater Operations Manager

    • “An amazing proto-slasher movie directed by Bob Clark that mixes tons of laughs with extremely dark Christmas-themed mayhem. Clark would go on to direct, A CHRISTMAS STORY, which is quite similar to BLACK CHRISTMAS, minus the obscene phone calls and murders.” 

 

A CHRISTMAS CAROL (1984) – Guy Wheatley, Head Projectionist

    • “When it comes to epitomizing the character, George C. Scott *is* Ebenezer Scrooge. You believe his every caustic remark about Christmas, and his redemption is the most poignantly reminiscent of Scott’s own career. This Christmas Carol is the only Dickens you need.”

JUST FRIENDS (2005) – Abby Derrick,  Front of House Staff

    • “Reminds me of long winter nights spent with my sisters. Every Christmas Eve, we’d stay up all night watching this over and over, the jokes getting funnier with every watch. It’s the perfectly funny movie to ring in the new year.”

MIXED NUTS (1994) – Zoey Wiltsey, Event Manager

    • “For me, the holiday season doesn’t really start until I’ve watched Mixed Nuts. It’s been a tradition since early adolescence. I love Nora Ephron’s dark sense of humor and I find the 90’s sensibilities very comforting around this time of year.”

Holiday Films at SLFS

We hope the variety of seasonal movies and personal experiences shared by our staff add some cinematic perspective to your holiday season (and maybe even some inspiration for the next holiday movie night!).

At Salt Lake Film Society, we can’t think of a better present for the people you love then the gift of cinema. Consider sharing and supporting access to quality independent film this holiday season, with a gift membership to our Red Carpet Club!



Find this holiday list on Letterboxd! We have curated lists from SLFS Staff there, including the films mentioned in this post, here.

SLFS Staff: The Unique Passage of Time in a Movie Theater

At Salt Lake Film Society, we believe that the visual stories of film are at their best on the big screen. Whether it’s the dark room, the imposing visuals, or the access to movie theater popcorn, the unique experience of watching a movie in a movie theater is not lost on our patrons, or our staff members. In our blog this week, we hear from Ally Lantz, Theater Manager at Broadway Centre Cinemas, on the amplified experience of watching her favorite director, Celine Sciamma, on the big screen.


“Why do we enjoy spending our time watching movies at a movie theater? While it’s a seemingly simple question, there are a wide variety of answers depending on who you ask. For some, it might be the popcorn and snacks, while for others it might be the communal and social viewing experience. For myself, I like watching in a theater because I enjoy being immersed in the pace of a film. Watching at home, time is beholden to our control and to our terms. You can pause and disrupt the film experience at any moment.

But in a theater you must entirely relinquish your control of time. You allow yourself to be swept up in the story’s passage of time, often experiencing time in a different way. If you are lucky, you will find yourself leaving the cinema feeling as though you have just emerged from a cocoon, where the film’s relatively brief runtime has materialized into an epic cinematic journey. 

Sciamma in The Movie Theater

This unique passage of time is why I love watching films in a theater, and is no better exemplified than through the work of Celine Sciamma, a favorite of mine. Sciamma manipulates time in the service of elevating the emotional weight of her stories. Earlier this year, she released a new film, Petite Maman, which follows an 8-year-old named Nelly after her beloved grandmother passed away. She helps her parents clean out her mother’s childhood home and what follows is a tender meditation on grief and familial relationships. 

a photo of SLFS Staff member Ally Lantz standing next to a movie theater poster for Petite Maman
Lantz standing next to the Petite Maman poster at the Broadway

Petite Maman is a film that has led me to months of decryption and contemplation. If you asked me how long a movie should be to fully explore the complex thematic content typical of Sciamma, I would say you would need something akin to a 3-hour narrative. Yet Sciamma manifests a layered epic within a brief 72 minutes.

The young girls’ interactions occur beyond the sphere of chronological time, but these characters are not in stasis, and the full weight of emotion that the more traditional passage of time would imply is still communicated effortlessly. I saw this film at our own Broadway Centre Cinemas and even with an unusually short runtime, I drifted into a sort of limbo; where literal time passage was irrelevant, it felt like days or even weeks had gone by.

The Passage of Time in Portrait of a Lady on Fire

In another Sciamma film, Portrait of a Lady on Fire, there are only a few indicators that time has passed at all, in reality and in the story. The clearest is the presence or absence of the Mother character, and upon her departure, our two female leads find themselves suspended in a timeless bubble. Within this space the characters are free to indulge in infatuation, their mutual experience undisturbed and their love permitted to develop.

When the Mother returns, this bubble suddenly bursts, and with a twisted urgency, it all begins to move too quickly. Time starts running out, and our characters become aware of the impending and unavoidable conclusion. We watch their experiences begin to transform into memories, which are altered by the emotions and complexity of their circumstances.

still of Celine Sciamma, Noémie Merlant and Adèle Haenel on the set of Portrait of a Lady on Fire
Noémie Merlant, Adèle Haenel, and director Celine Sciamma on the set of Portrait of a Lady On Fire

This memory of mine was made possible by the insulated and attentive nature of the movie theater viewing experience (and the following dream-like state). If I had not experienced the story within the controlled theatrical environment, the impact of Sciamma’s story and the connection I felt to it would not have been possible.

If you look at Portrait of a Lady on Fire as a story told from the memory of Marianne, one of the two main characters, the intent behind the malleability of time is clear. It is her memory that alters time and the pace of this story, blending moments and experiences into the physical passage of time itself. I remember walking out of the theater after watching this film, feeling like I had just emerged from an emotional fever dream.

The experience of watching Celine Sciamma’s films has been described as “unwrapping a present from someone who loves you”; tender and intimate, and occupying not just the linear flow of moment to moment, but the space of memory and feeling. The best way to immerse yourself in this playful rendering of time is to give yourself fully to the experience. The spell may be broken if you hit pause, so please next time Sciamma or any of your favorite filmmakers releases a film, head to your nearest cinema (like Broadway Centre Cinemas). These films are made to be seen in theaters and being in one is a part of the experience you will not want to miss out on.”


To see a list of our upcoming films and events, click here.
To join our Red Carpet Club, or to learn more about RCC levels, discounts, and benefits, click here.


SLFS and The Voices Behind Filméxico

At Salt Lake Film Society, our mission revolves around the power that film has to not only entertain our community, but also help them engage. We are proud of the independent films we screen, and the powerful and engaging stories they tell, and there’s no better example of this engaging communal power than our Cultural Film Tours.

Poster featuring a list of films screening during Filmexico 2022
Click on this poster for the upcoming schedule for Filméxico, and find a film and panel that interests you most!

As one of the longest-running and most highly-attended cultural tours we help put on at SLFS, Filméxico has been offering access to incredible selections of contemporary Mexican cinema in Utah every year for the last decade. With extensive panel discussions and prominent works by Afro Mexican and Indigenous filmmakers (and now an extensive virtual community as well), Filméxico continues to provide culturally enriching and educational experiences for the Mexican and non-Mexican community alike in Salt Lake City. 

This incredible visual storytelling tour of Mexican culture and creators wasn’t organized overnight though. Filméxico is realized every year through a large and extensive collaboration with our presenting partners Consulado de México en Salt Lake City, and Artes De México en Utah, as well as a long list of other organizations and individuals (which you can see in it’s entirety at the end of this blog). In our post this week, we want you to hear from a few different folks and organizations who make this incredible exhibition of Mexican independent film possible. Find out what they love about Filméxico, and get a preview of some films and panel discussions you won’t want to miss.

Hear From Those Who Made Filméxico Possible

“Filméxico is a unique platform that allows people to learn about the great diversity of the peoples and cultures of Mexico with the purpose to create cultural awareness and cultural connections within the US. People feel represented, included, authenticated by this important venue, and we’re especially excited for people to come out and see. Los Gigantes del Pastizal (The Grassland Giants). Filméxico has become a way to celebrate our diversity of film through art and to give opportunity to our community to have a voice through the panel discussions. Together we celebrate and elevate the voices of our community” 

“Salt Lake City is lucky to have Filméxico because it is a culturally enriching experience unique to our town. The documentaries offer valuable educational experiences, and the features and shorts give us a glimpse into Mexico’s rich independent film scene. ¡Gracias a SLFS y viva Filméxico!”

Filméxico has been one of my favorite film festivals for years as it’s a space that uplifts the work of contemporary Mexican filmmakers. Through the impeccable programming offered, Utah audiences experience Mexico in an authentic and unique way. I was most impacted—visually and emotionally—by the documentary Mamá (Mom), a film by director Xun Sero. Through intimate conversations between the filmmaker and his mother, we learn about their past as they try to understand it and each other. Sero’s mother is quick-witted and wise, and her story will make you smile and break your heart all at the same time.

"Representation STILL matters! As a queer Mexican educator and indie film buff, it is often hard to find myself represented in the documentaries and narratives shown on the big screen. Filméxico brings the stories of my people to life! I also get to share these films—and free passes—with my students at Salt Lake Community College where I work. Being the oldest of three, I’m most looking forward to watching Mamá (Mom). The often-contentious bond between my own mother and I makes me excited to see these themes come alive in a theater. Thank you Salt Lake Film Society for reminding our community that BROWN IS BEAUTIFUL! "

SLFS Cultural Tours

These snippets are from just a few of the extraordinary people who volunteer their time to make Filméxico such an authentic and engaging experience for all. Through the extensive collaboration and planning process, SLFS and these dedicated organizations have worked tirelessly to ensure that the films and events presented are relevant and meaningful to the people they serve, because they are co-created by the people they serve.

So come out to Broadway Centre Cinemas starting this Thursday 11/10 thru 11/17 to experience seven days of authentic Mexican stories told on the big screen. Take the opportunity to view prominent works by indigenous filmmakers, as well as seasoned, new and local talent. Engage with a series of panel discussions by Mexican filmmakers, Utah community leaders and cultural binational specialists and allies, available on slfsathome.org.

Browse the list of films, panels, and showtimes at slfs.org/filmexico.

PRESENTING PARTNERS

  • Salt Lake Film Society
  • Consulado de México en Salt Lake City
  • Artes de México en Utah

MAJOR GRANTORS

  • ZAP – Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts & Parks
  • State of Utah Legislature
  • Utah Department of Arts & Museums
  • National Endowment for the Arts
  • Salt Lake City ACE Fund

SPONSORS

  • University of Utah Center for Latin American Studies
  • Secretaria de Cultura
  • University of Utah Tanner Humanities Center
  • IMCINE
  • University of Utah Osher Lifelong Learning
  • Mexicano-Latino Institute in Utah
  • Sundance Institute
  • Spyhop
  • Monarca Restaurant
  • Zólupez Cerveza

 

To see a list of our upcoming films and events, click here.
To join our Red Carpet Club, or to learn more about RCC levels, discounts, and benefits, click here.

 

 

How Films Make Us Feel Emotion

While some folks might not readily admit to it, many of us have cried while watching a movie. These could be tears of sadness for the looming passing of the family dog in Marley and Me, or of exultation during scenes of joyous reunion and relief at the end of It’s a Wonderful Life. For many people, (cinephiles and non-cinephiles alike), there is at least one movie scene at some point which has overwhelmed them with an acute wave of emotion.

a still from the final scene of the film It's a Wonderful Life
For many, the iconic ending of It’s a Wonderful Life is a guaranteed tear-jerker

The stories that film tells and the immersive way it tells them have always had a capacity to foster our sympathetic and empathetic tendencies, help us grow emotionally, and connect more with others. Whether you watch a documentary about human suffering thousands of miles away or a narrative that reveals the less than evident truths about your own life, watching a film can be emotional, and that is a good thing. How does film do this and what exactly about the art of film makes us feel the emotions we do when we watch? 

This powerful quality of film sits at the heart of why we love it here at SLFS, and why we are committed to providing access to independent film to our community. We are proud to show a wide variety of independent films that help our patrons not just think, but also feel. The more we can understand and discuss this emotive-inducing power of film, the better all of us in our community can be at engaging with the diverse and thought-provoking benefits of cinema.  

Independent Film = Your Brain On Empathy

Emotions are a vital aspect of the storytelling ability that a movie has. Emotions are also vital characteristics of the larger human experience; they are a fundamental part of what makes us sentient, complex creatures. In the modern age of scientific research and medical technology, emotions can be more precisely defined and measured through brain scans of our neural networks and what we know about the different chemicals that our brains release to cause emotional states. And as it turns out, movies are more than capable of inducing and effecting these states.

Humans are naturally empathetic beings; when we see or hear something sad, we are likely to feel sad. When we watch a story on the big screen, we automatically generate some investment in the characters. The way we absorb their depicted plights and decisions often invests us in an emotional cinematic reality, even if we are not directly experiencing the situations in question.

There are countless studies that demonstrate a link between storytelling and empathy, but it also doesn’t take a scientific study to know that movies offer one of the more effective forms of storytelling in human history. In fact, film is so effective at inducing empathy and emotion in people, it is used by researchers as a method to actually induce emotions in subjects, in order to study the brain simultaneously as they feel them. 

Different neural networks activate different types of empathy in research participants who watched an intense scene from Black Swan

For neuroscience researchers like Talma Hendler at Tel Aviv University in Israel, movies offer a useful tool to study how emotions fluctuate in real time and what’s going on in the brain when we feel certain ways. Hendler and her team have been investigating neural networks in the brain and their role in empathy, and have found evidence for two types of empathy. Mental empathy, when people step outside of themselves to think about what another person is thinking or experiencing, and embodied empathy, more of an in-the-moment internalization and adoption of an experience and its emotions.

It’s hard to say which type of empathy an audience member might be feeling during a specific scene, whether they are understanding the rationale and perspective of a character’s feelings, or more acutely feeling the character’s feelings themselves. But one thing is for sure; the empathetic storytelling that film is capable of can play with our emotions like few other forms of media can.

Playing With the Audiences Emotions

As much as there is to understand about the science of why film makes us feel emotion, what about the techniques behind filmmaking itself? How do filmmakers shape their narrative and use all the storytelling tools at their disposal to make us feel?

When filmmakers are crafting shots and dialogue, and considering how to tell the story of the scene, while they might not be contemplating the science of neural networks or the difference between mental and embodied empathy, their attention towards the emotions of their audience is quite purposeful.

“We’re always thinking about how to get into an emotional state, moment by moment, and how to bring as much of the audience along with us,” said Darren Aronofsky, acclaimed director of psychological dramas like Black Swan, Mother!, and The Wrestler in a Wired 2014 interview. It could be through stunning visual perspectives of proper cinematography, swelling crescendos of an orchestral soundtrack, or a well-written line acted and delivered to perfection; filmmakers craft their scenes and visual storylines with concentrated intent of making their audience feel.

an image of neural networks overlayed on a brain, next to a still from the film Black Swan
Javier Bardem and Jennifer Lawrence in Mother!, another psychological horror film from the mind of Darren Aronofsky

As much as the artistry of a film and its filmmaker plays a big role in this, there are also other psychological aspects of film that naturally contribute to the keen emotions that many moviegoers feel when they watch on the big screen. According to professor of psychology at Washington University, Jefferey Zachs, mimicry and music play vital roles in the emotions that film can make us feel.

“[Our brains] say that it’s a good idea to mimic the visual input that we’re seeing…if you watch somebody in the theater and there’s a smiling face filling the screen, most of the audience is going to pop a little bit of a smile…In film, a filmmaker has the opportunity to integrate those things very tightly. They can control exactly what’s shown of the face, and what else is present [on the screen].”

In regards to music in film, Zachs says the type and the timing also play a big role in inducing emotion. Sad moments in movies use slow music composed in a minor key to hammer home the sad things they depict. Minor key music can induce the same kind of sad feelings that we feel when we see people cry or watch bad things happen to people. “You put all those things together and it’s just taking the mechanisms that we encounter in real life and just really pushing all the buttons at once.” Zachs concluded.

Independent Films in Salt Lake City – SLFS

At Salt Lake Film Society, the emotional power of visual storytelling is at the heart of the impact we make in our community. Whether it’s anecdotal or based in scientific research, there is  consistently reaffirmed evidence that a compelling visual narrative can alter our brain’s chemistry. Films can make us feel, in a way that is strangely close to how we might feel if we were actually living these emotional experiences ourselves.

This invaluable form of sharing an emotional connection with others reinforces the unique and underrepresented voices inherent in our  independent film programming. This pairing helps cultivate an introspective and compassionate arts experience for the entire community, a process that SLFS has proudly been a part of for over 21 years. So come join us for an independent film at Salt Lake Film Society, and maybe you too can be a part of an emotional experience bigger than yourself.

To see a list of our upcoming films and events, click here.
To join our Red Carpet Club, or to learn more about RCC levels, discounts, and benefits, click here.


Rocky Horror Picture Show

Let’s Do The Time Warp Again… Rocky Is Back

Rocky Horror Picture Show returns to SLFS! We are bringing our live performance event to the Broadway Centre Cinemas with four unique opportunities to experience this cult classic. Starting 10/27, 10/28 and 10/31, we will be hosting different screenings so you can choose how you want to spend your evening celebrating this cult classic.

The Out Of The Shadows cast is back for all screenings with live performances that occur with the movie. There are different performances with two separate emcees and one with a shadow cast. We will also be providing a screening of the film that is the movie only if you’d rather.

Screenings with live performers will have the doors open and a live pre-show that starts 30 minutes prior to the movie. Prop bags are included in your ticket price and will be handed out at entry. No outside props will be accepted into the theater.   

Mature Audiences Only. 18+.

The following production includes language and themes that may be triggering to certain individuals. This event includes graphic language, sexual content as permitted within Utah law, blood, assault, and uses language that some viewers may find offensive and/or dehumanizing. In addition the event is loud, cast members will be wandering the auditorium, and props will be tossed in the air, and audience members may move, stand, yell, and behave generally raucous. SLFS encourages viewers to consider their own personal mental health before purchasing a ticket or attending any Salt Lake Film Society Rocky Horror Picture Show event.

Here is the Rocky Horror Picture Show parental guide via IMDB.

The event is a live show and the SLFS disclaimer will apply. As live-shows are unpredictable, we encourage all ticket buyers to know the disclaimer below.

UPDATE: We will have a waitlist going. You’ll need to come in at least 1 hr prior to showtime and we’ll sell tickets if seats are available.

FULL LIVE CAST + GUEST EMCEE SUSAN STEFFEE 
10/27 (SOLD OUT), 10/28 (SOLD OUT), 10/31 (SOLD OUT) at 10:30 pm ; $25/person includes prop bag
 
 
 
Due to the graphic nature of this show no one under 18 will be admitted 
 
Photo ID will be required at time of entry at security entrance.
 
Admission includes Prop Kit
 
No bags, outside props, or cosplay weapons permitted 
Not intended for all viewers, audience discretion advised.
Closed Caption devices available for live shows 
 
Join us for our most raucous, wild, and very unruly screening of the motion picture film Rocky Horror Picture Show, accompanied by a live shadow-cast. This show includes a full-cast (all key characters) provided by Latter Day Transvestites/Out of the Shadows Theater Company as well as local, infamous emcee Susan Steffee.  Susan has been emcee for Rocky Horror Picture Shows at the Tower Theater for over 40 years – and counting! 
 
She’s time warped so much, you will hear lines never-heard-in-other-states or at other shows. 
 
This irreverent show will include shadow-cast reenactments of scenes, costumes to feast the eyes upon, and Susan’s mad-libs throughout the entire show. 
 

Rocky Horror emcees traditionally talk over the entire film with a microphone, so if you have interest in hearing or seeing the film in it’s pure form, without an emcee, look for the film-only screening times. 

This show is adult in nature, includes language and themes that are not for all individuals, SLFS recommends individuals do their own research to determine if an event is appropriate for them. The SLFS Rocky Horror event disclaimer is below, please view before purchasing a ticket or attending this event. 

 
 
More about the Shadow Cast: 
The Latter Day Transvestites (LDT) have been feeding your Rocky addiction since 1995 (officially). From the Blue Mouse to the Tower Theatre, and possibly before, The Rocky Horror Picture Show has been playing in the Salt Lake City area. The cast started officially in 1995 and dubbed “The Little Cast of Horrors”, LDT has been through personnel changes, personal disasters, and near prosecution by the local vice squad. In 1997 we changed the name to the Latter Day Transvestites to reflect our heritage and our personal fashion preferences.
 
Come join us as we take a step to the right into our version of reality.
 
The performance by the Latter Day Transvestites is brought to you by the Out of the Shadows Theater Group (OSTG). OSTG provides an alternative aspect to the performing arts and cinema. Catering to cult film followers and encouraging audience participation. OSTG is an ongoing presence in Salt Lake City through local media, live performances and community events. Our shadow casts are known for their improvisations and witty call backs while performing to well known and loved cult films.
LIVE CAST + GUEST EMCEE AMANDA DUSOE
10/27 (SOLD OUT), 10/28 (SOLD OUT), 10/31 (SOLD OUT) at 10:30 pm ; $25/person includes prop bag
 
 
Due to the graphic nature of this show no one under 18 will be admitted 
 
Photo ID will be required at time of entry at security entrance.
 
Admission includes prop-kit 
 
No bags, outside props, or cosplay weapons permitted 
Not intended for all viewers, audience discretion advised 
 Closed Caption devices available for live shows
Join us for a gender swapped, informal and raucous screening of the motion picture film Rocky Horror Picture Show, accompanied by a live shadow-cast. This show includes a full-cast (all key characters) playing roles of a differing gender than the on-screen characters, provided by Latter Day Transvestites/Out of the Shadows Theater Company as well as local, emcee Amanda Dusoe. 
 
This irreverent show will include shadow-cast reenactments of scenes, costumes to feast the eyes upon, and Amanda’s mad-libs throughout the entire show.
 
Rocky Horror emcees traditionally talk over the entire film with a microphone, so if you have interest in hearing or seeing the film in it’s pure form, without an emcee, look for the film-only screening times. The price of admission includes Prop Kits to interact with the movie and cast.  This show is adult in nature, includes language and themes that are not for all individuals, SLFS recommends individuals do their own research to determine if an event is appropriate for them. The SLFS Rocky Horror event disclaimer is below, please view before purchasing a ticket or attending this event. 
 
More about the Shadow Cast: 
The Latter Day Transvestites (LDT) have been feeding your Rocky addiction since 1995 (officially). From the Blue Mouse to the Tower Theatre, and possibly before, The Rocky Horror Picture Show has been playing in the Salt Lake City area. The cast started officially in 1995 and dubbed “The Little Cast of Horrors”, LDT has been through personnel changes, personal disasters, and near prosecution by the local vice squad. In 1997 we changed the name to the Latter Day Transvestites to reflect our heritage and our personal fashion preferences. Come join us as we take a step to the right into our version of reality.
 
The performance by the Latter Day Transvestites is brought to you by the Out of the Shadows Theater Group (OSTG). OSTG provides an alternative aspect to the performing arts and cinema. Catering to cult film followers and encouraging audience participation. OSTG is an ongoing presence in Salt Lake City through local media, live performances and community events. Our shadow casts are known for their improvisations and witty call backs while performing to well known and loved cult films.
 
 
ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW 
10/27, 10/28, 10/31 at 10:30 pm ; $20/person + prop bag
 

ORIGINAL MOTION PICTURE

No shadow cast or emcee

Due to the graphic nature of this show no one under 18 will be admitted Photo ID will be required at time of entry at security entrance. No bags, outside props, or cosplay weapons permitted. Not intended for all viewers, audience discretion advised.

 


All ticket proceeds benefit SLFS.   

DISCLAIMER: 

By purchasing a ticket for or participating in any Rocky Horror Picture Show event planned and controlled by Salt Lake Film Society, you agree to the following:

  1. Salt Lake Film Society Rocky Horror Picture Show events are provided with no warranty either express or implied. The Organizers, including but not limited to the Staff, Board,  Advisory, Volunteers, Cast, and Sponsors, of Salt Lake Film Society Rocky Horror Picture Show events assume no liability for any loss, theft, damage, trauma, triggering complaints or injury to property or persons, including death, whether arising in contract, negligence, equity, or otherwise.
  2. You assume all risks when participating in Salt Lake Film Society Rocky Horror Picture Show events. All participants must use care and good judgment and must obey all rules and regulations and code of conduct of Salt Lake Film Society. You will comply with all requests made by employees or volunteers or contracted staff of Salt Lake Film Society and its representatives. You must obey all laws of the State of Utah. Salt Lake Film Society reserves the right to eject any participant who does not comply with the terms of this section. Ejected participants will not be entitled to a refund or any further recourse.
  3. You will defend, indemnify and hold harmless Salt Lake Film Society and its organizers, directors, employees, consultants, agents, affiliates for any and all legal actions arising out of participation in Salt Lake Film Society Rocky Horror Picture Show events. You further agree to pay all legal fees incurred by Salt Lake Film Society that arise due to this agreement.
  4. You give Salt Lake Film Society authorization to use and post any photographs, videotapes, recordings or any other record of our events, before during or after the event for promotional use, at any area of our event venues, reporting to the media and to publish on our website or blog. You will not be entitled to any compensation for Salt Lake Film Society’s use of your name or image.
  5. Refunds for any reason will be at the discretion of Salt Lake Film Society.
  6. Salt Lake Film Society reserves the right to exclude anyone from becoming a Salt Lake Film Society participant should they choose not to accept this Agreement.