Support SLFS here or join the Red Carpet Club here. | Summer Showdown begins May 31. Get tickets now.

Stanley Kubrick & Akira Kurosawa

Masters of cinema! KUBRICK & KUROSAWA. March 2024. Every Friday and Saturday. See these classics on the big screen. Get tix now -> www.slfstix.org 

MARCH 1: 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY
MARCH 2: YOJIMBO
MARCH 8: RAN
MARCH 9: FULL METAL JACKET
MARCH 15: DR. STRANGELOVE OR: HOW I LEARNED TO STOP WORRYING AND LOVE THE BOMB
MARCH 16: SEVEN SAMURAI
MARCH 22: STRAY DOGS
MARCH 23: A CLOCKWORK ORANGE
MARCH 29: THE KILLING
MARCH 30: RASHOMON

Czech That Film

March 26 - March 27

CZECH THAT FILM IS BACK

Czech That Film series is a carefully curated selection of recent Czech cinema. Salt Lake Film Society and the Czech Consulate is excited to be bringing this event back to Broadway this year.  

ADMISSIONS

INDIVIDUAL FILM TICKETS
$12 per film screening
 
PASSES
$40 All Access Pass includes access to all Czech That Film in person films and events.
 
All tickets and film passes are available at SLFStix.org.

VISITING GUEST

Jaroslav Olša Jr. is the author of books and articles on history, culture and literature of Asia and Africa and historical relations of the non-European countries with the Czech Lands. He has also widely published about science fiction and edited over a dozen anthologies of Czech and international science fiction. He has published in a wide-range of publications such as Czech edition of National Geographic, Nový Orient (New Orient), Světová literatura (World Literature), Mezinárodní politika (Foreign Policy), Mezinárodní vztahy (International Relations). He was also a curator of art exhibitions, member of the jury of 2011 Bucheon International Fantastic Film Festival, and initiated numerous cultural exchanges and activities.

FILM SCHEDULE

Tues March 26

6:30 pm

Bod obnovy (Restore Point)

(1 hr 55 min)

9 pm

Bratři (Brothers)

(2 hr 15 min)

Wed March 27

7 pm

Úsvit (We Have Never Been Modern)

(1 h 57 min)

9 pm

Přišla v noci (She Came At Night)

(1 hr 25 min)

 

FILMS

Listed alphabetically by title. All films are in Czech with English subtitles. 

BOD OBNOVY (RESTORE POINT)

TUESDAY, MARCH 26 | 6:30 PM

1 hr 55 min | 2023 | Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland, Serbia | Not Rated | Czech, Slovak | Feature

Directed by Robert Hloz

Set in central Europe during 2041, a female detective investigates the case of a murdered couple where a restoration team is able to bring one of them back to life.

BRATŘI (BROTHERS)

TUESDAY, MARCH 26 | 9 PM

2 hr 15 min | 2023 | Czech Republic, Germany, Slovakia | Not Rated | Czech | Feature

Directed by Tomáš Mašín

In October 1953, five friends decide to leave communist Czechoslovakia and get to West Berlin. They manage to cross the guarded border but are soon detected in East German territory. Unknowingly, they initiate the largest armed manoeuvre since WW2; twenty thousand German Police and Soviet Army members are mobilised, all because of five teenage boys.

PŘIŠLA V NOCI (SHE CAME AT NIGHT)

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 27 | 9 PM

1 hr 25 min | 2023 | Czech Republic | Not Rated | Czech | Feature

Directed by Tomás Pavlícek, Jan Vejnar

When a couple of thirty-somethings let the mother of one of them cross the threshold into their home, they have no idea that they have just entered a kind of purgatory. Their peaceful life is slowly transformed into a chaotic wreck. Valerie, a well-groomed woman in her sixties, is an energetic diva who little by little conquers not only the space of the apartment, but also the minds of its occupants. As the creeping home invasion gains force, certainties are undermined and the boundaries of privacy are demolished. Are moms and mothers-in-law always right? Do they have good intentions toward us? And isn’t that why they are the scariest monsters of them all?

ÚSVIT (WE HAVE NEVER BEEN MODERN)

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 27 | 7 PM

1 hr 57 min | 2023 | Czech Republic, Slovakia | Not Rated | Czech | Feature

Directed by Matěj Chlupáček

Helena, is about to give birth and face a rosy future in a modern city, as the pregnant wife of an important factory manager. However, all her illusions soon perish, as the dead body of a newborn intersex baby is found in the middle of their factory.

Presenting Black Cinema

Presenting Black Cinema is a series in February to spotlight the unique and varied experience of black cinema.

During February we will have films opening on Sunday for limited runs throughout the week. These films include such varied genres as documentaries, dramas, romance, and horror.

Check out the schedule below. Showtimes May Vary. Tickets will be on sale soon at www.slfstix.org.

Feb 4: I AM NOT YOUR NEGRO
FEB 11: TIME
FEB 18: LOVE AND BASKETBALL
FEB 25: GANJA AND HESS

Tower Of Terror at Broadway

Tower Of Terror is back! Every weekend starting Sept. 8, we will be featuring horror films that will have you looking over your shoulder. While the Tower is under renovation, this year we will be screening these seasonal classics at Broadway Centre Cinemas.

Don't Forget... Invincible Czars 9/6 & 9/7

Grab tickets while you can for our kick off of the spooky season with the Invincible Czars! Celebrating their 20th anniversary, we are excited to have these amazing artists play their original scores to two of the silent era’s most influential masterpieces.

See these silent film classics with a live accompaniment score at the Broadway starting at 7:00 pm:
THE CABINET OF DR. CALIGARI (1920) – Sept 6
NOSFERATU (1922) – Sept 7

Get tickets now – > www.slfstix.org 

Sundance and SLFS Local Lens Screening 7/28

Festival Favorites. For Utahns. For Free. Sundance Film Festival: Local Lens program is a series of FREE screenings happening July 26–29.

Get information on all screenings -> https://www.sundance.org/local-lens/
Get tickets while supplies last.

RSVP for FREE tickets to these films screening at SLFS on 7/28:
Kokomo City at 7:00 pm -> RSVP
Birth/Rebirth at 11:30 pm -> RSVP

Kokomo City
Birth/Rebirth

Guest Blog: José talks SLFS and Queer Cinema

José (he/they/them) identifies as a queer, Mexican, immigrant, educator, and film-buff. They currently serve as the Assistant Director for Community Engagement at the Thayne Center, Salt Lake Community College, where they help connect students to the many opportunities for service and engagement through community partners, and also oversee basic needs programs like the Bruin Pantry. In their free time, José can be found ingesting copious amounts of television, throwing a dinner party for their family and friends, traveling, camping, and of course catching the latest indie flick at the Broadway. 


“Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, Something Blue”

“Growing up as an undocumented, queer, brown kid in Utah has not always been rainbows and butterflies. Media representations, especially in movies, of my life experiences have been hard to come by especially when I was coming out of the closet as an undergrad at the University of Utah. I would fill the evenings in my dorm room watching queer movies I had inconspicuously rented from the Tower Theater—ok, now I’m dating myself!

This is why Salt Lake Film Society has always had such a special place in my heart; it unlocked stories of what it meant to be queer, plus it gave me a community where I could feel safe to be myself and talk about the films I love. But it would be hard to list all the impactful queer films I’ve seen with SLFS, so I’ll just choose “something old, something new, something borrowed, and something blue”.

a still from the queer cinema film played at SLFS, Brokeback Mountain
Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal in the queer cinema classic, BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN

In terms of something old, in January 2006 after having wrapped up my first semester of college, I started hearing about a “controversial” film that some theaters in Salt Lake City were refusing to show. BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN (2005, dir. Ang Lee) was a pre-marriage equality film with two Hollywood stars (Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal) really going at it rough and raw—all puns intended. This immediately piqued my interest, not to mention that SLFS was proudly showing the film in their theaters.

Although I was horrified by the brutal ending which depicted a violent hate crime ultimately leading to the protagonist’s death, this was one of the first times I had seen same-sex love and sex on a big screen.  From then on, I wanted more stories that depicted something closer to my lived experiences.

A new film I look forward to experiencing again on the big screen is ROTTING IN THE SUN (2023, dir. Sebastian Silva). During its Sundance premiere which I saw at the Broadway, this film’s penis and gay sex filled scenes were all the buzz. Well, it did not disappoint! Be ready to see every kind of penis under the sun in the first 30 minutes, before making a sharp left and being delivered into a thrilling story about the cover up of an accidental murder.

Playing a frenzied domestic worker, Catalina Saavedra thrusts this film forward— I could not help but to think of my mom who has worked various housekeeping jobs in the city— and provides the perfect foil to the nihilistic, suicidal protagonist. Queer or hetero, young and old, everyone who has seen the film has been captured by its whacky charm (and hopefully SLFS is able to pick it up when it comes out in September!).

For something borrowed (again from Sundance) and something blue, I want to celebrate how far the diversity of lived experiences has come in queer cinema. TANGERINE (2015, dir. Sean Baker) and MOONLIGHT (2016, dir. Barry Jenkins) each touched my heart in different ways. TANGERINE tells a story of true friendship through the eyes of two transgendered Black and Brown sex workers in the streets of L.A. Not only was this movie completely filmed on the streets with iPhones, but Sean Baker has gone on to make extraordinary, award-nominated, indie films about people living on the edge, including THE FLORIDA PROJECT and RED ROCKET.

a still from the queer cinema movie Moonlight
Trevante Rhodes and André Holland in the Oscar-winning MOONLIGHT

With melodic, blue delivery, MOONLIGHT takes us through different stages of the protagonist’s life as he is met with violence for being his authentic self. The liberation he experiences through vulnerability against a hyper-masculine, homophobic society is a lesson that I continue to enact in different ways in my own life.

Queer cinema has come a very long way from the cliché coming of age stories with cisgender, white, male protagonists having oh so many will-they-won’t-they moments. Salt Lake Film Society creates a space and community for folx like me to feel seen and heard. The exploration of gender, sexuality, and identity through film is one with growing voices and perspectives, and I’m excited to keep coming back to the big screen as we continue to celebrate queer, trans, BiPoC independent stories for queers to come!”


Supporting and Showcasing Queer Cinema – SLFS

At Salt Lake Film Society, we are proud to exhibit a wide variety of queer cinema and stories to our Salt Lake City community, both during Pride month, and during all the other months too.

If you value these kinds of stories, and your community’s access to them, please consider supporting us! All donations received before July 15th will be matched through a generous offer from a local family foundation. Donate or join the Red Carpet Club during this matching period and see your support of SLFS and queer cinema doubled during this matching period!

To see a list of our upcoming films and events, click here.
To join our Red Carpet Club, or to learn more about RCC levels, discounts, and benefits, click here.


SLFS: Putting Classic Movies Back In Theaters

Like any engaging form of art, film is a medium that is often defined and disseminated through its most classic works. Whether defining the genre of the time and influencing works of the future, or achieving renown only in hindsight after being popularized by the next generation, “classic” movies have always existed as vital storytelling pieces for everything from entire countries, to entire generations.

At Salt Lake Film Society, repertory films and classic movies are a crucial part of our programming repertoire. While there are incredible independent films being released all the time (many of which we are lucky enough to show at the Broadway), for many people, classic movies are the driving force behind their love of film and the impactful connection they have with it. And what better way to re-experience the magic of these classics than how they were intended: on the big screen?

Keep reading to learn why seeing a classic movie on the big screen matters (or click here to view our Summer Showdown schedule of classic movies at the Broadway this summer!). And don’t forget; until July 15th, all donations will be matched through a generous offer from a local family foundation. So if you value access to independent film and things like seeing classic movies on the big screen, this is the perfect time to show us your support! Click here to see our progress so far, and make your own contribution!

What Exactly is a Classic Movie?

While there is no official definition, it’s not exactly easy to qualify what is considered a classic. It could be an Oscar-laden adventure trilogy integral to pop-culture, or a dated love story full of big-name stars during their younger years, or even a low-budget horror flick that achieves “cult” status in the modern Internet age. 

a picture of Jeff Bridges, Steve Buscemi, and John Goodman in the classic movie The Big Lebowski
Jeff Bridges, Steve Buscemi, and John Goodman in the The Big Lebowski, part of the 2023 Summer Showdown lineup

The definition of a “classic” movie is often defined less by its content or fame and more by its staying power through the years, both in our minds and our culture. It’s the iconic stories, whose themes and outcomes still feel relevant even upwards of 70 years after a film’s release. It’s the iconic performances from Hollywood legends or unknown actors announcing their skill to the world. It’s the extremes, both the extremely good and the extremely bad, that still get parodied on sketch shows and quoted between colleagues.

There is no reliable formula for making a classic movie, especially when it comes to cult classics, as they seem to become popular despite themselves, which makes their nostalgic success even more unpredictable. Even the very nature of a classic means that people won’t definitively know if it qualifies as a classic until years later, and like with any art form, ambiguity and personal taste play a big part. Similarly to how the Supreme Court defined pornography in 1964, it’s hard to describe and specifically define, but many people know it when they see it.

Capturing the Magic of Classic Movies, In Theaters

However, like any classic in any other artistic medium, watching a classic movie nowand trying to “recapture” the authentic magic and the power it brought to both initial and later audiences isn’t so easy. For example, while many of us know works of art from the Renaissance era, most of us have only seen a photo of the Mona Lisa painting or the Michaelangelo statue of David, and only in a digital era long past the widespread fame of painting and sculptures. 

Patrick Swayze and Jennifer Grey doing the iconic lift in the classic movie Dirty Dancing
Patrick Swayze and Jennifer Grey doing the iconic lift in Dirty Dancing, another classic entry in our 2023 Summer Showdown lineup

While the era of film fame is alive and well today, the power of the big screen and a packed audience in a dark theater is unfortunately much easier to miss out on. And trying to experience the authenticity of a classic film when it’s streamed to your TV in your living room is akin to appreciating the Mona Lisa through a small image on your phone.

Getting to watch (or more likely, re-watch) these cinematic milestones on the big screen, sharing in a nostalgia trip with total strangers, and for many, re-living the magic of watching a classic when it first came out (and when it wasn’t even a classic yet) can be a powerful, and even emotional experience for many people. Classic movies have always been something that we have shared with both those close to us, and with those we don’t even know. Their staying power in our society and our communicative culture has always had the capacity to bring us closer together. And SLFS is proud to offer these classic movies in theaters to our Salt Lake City community.

See Classic Movies at SLFS Summer Showdown!

If classic movies are as important to you as they are to us, come down to the Broadway on a Friday or Saturday this summer, and see a film on the big screen that will take you on a little trip down memory lane. Or if you haven’t seen some of these classics before, there is truly no better way to experience them than on the big screen! Vote for your favorite film of our summer selections with your ticket purchase to the film, or any film-specific donations you want to provide by finding the poster in the Broadway lobby, scan the QR code of your favorite film, and donate if you want to see that film win! 

And don’t forget; until July 15th, all donations will be matched through a generous offer from a local family foundation. So if you value access to independent film and things like seeing classic movies on the big screen, this is the perfect time to show us your support! Click here to see our progress so far, and make your own contribution!

To see a list of our upcoming films and events, click here.
To join our Red Carpet Club, or to learn more about RCC levels, discounts, and benefits, click here.


SLFS Guest Post: Māsima 2023 and Lauren To’omalatai

Lauren To’omalatai is a Sāmoan screenwriter, director, and film programmer from West Valley City, Utah. She served as Director of the Utah Pacific Island Film Series for four years where she organized free community screenings showcasing films by and about Pacific Islanders throughout Salt Lake County. In 2021 she co-established the Māsima Film Tour with the Salt Lake Film Society to amplify this work and bring it to a wider audience. She is a proud alumni of imagineNATIVE’s Screenwriting: Features Intensive (2021) and Visual Communications “Armed With a Camera” Fellowship (2022-2023) under which she wrote and directed her debut short film “Snack”. You can find her on Instagram, and her website.


“Growing up in West Valley City, I was always surrounded by other Sāmoans and Pacific Islanders in my community. My parents spoke Sāmoan in the home, we ate Sāmoan food, attended a Sāmoan church, and danced in Polynesian groups. I was never the only Pacific Islander in any given place. I could always identify other Pacific Islanders by the way they looked, spoke, or my favorite, that signature boisterous laughter that seemed to follow us around, especially when we gathered together. I consider myself lucky there’s been a constant tether between myself and my heritage. 

During my junior year of high school, I became obsessed with film after watching Quentin Tarantino’s Inglourious Basterds. It was the spark that led me to watch other films, explore film history, and try my hand at screenwriting. This budding interest was supported by a theater in downtown Salt Lake City that showed independent and foreign cinema: the Broadway. I’d always loved to write but there was something specific about screenwriting that spoke to me.

This curiosity led me to pursue a Film Production degree after graduation. I didn’t complete the program, leaving school to get a full-time job to help support my household. I was disappointed I couldn’t finish my studies because during this time I’d become increasingly aware that although I didn’t feel like an outsider in my own community, the world of film and television had yet to catch up to the wealth of stories that Pacific Islanders had— a realization that fueled my desire to continue writing scripts, even if I wasn’t in a position to return to school. 

a photo of a screening from the Utah Pacific Island Film Series

A Utah Pacific Island Film Series community screening of the short documentary Standing Above the Clouds (2020).

A few weeks later, in March 2016, an opportunity presented itself in the form of a free film screening of a Sāmoan film. Maybe I wouldn’t be able to learn the ins and outs of filmmaking in a classroom but I could still attend this screening and hopefully find other Pacific Islanders who were as passionate about film as I was. The Utah Pacific Island Film Series, a program of Pacific Island Knowledge 2 Action Resources (PIK2AR), had an afternoon showing of My Fa’a Sāmoa directed by Ursula Ann Siataga.

This short depicted a Sāmoan family living in the Bay Area. It was the first time a piece of media directly reflected my own experiences as a first-generation Sāmoan living in the diaspora. Although set in an entirely different state, it was a powerful moment to see the same ways Sāmoan culture was made malleable and molded around the way other young Sāmoans and their families in the U.S. were living. 

At the screening I met my mentor and friend Susi Feltch-Malohifo’ou, Executive Director of PIK2AR and for the next few years volunteered at screenings and attended Pasifika inclusive Sundance events. In 2019 I became Director until February 2020 when Covid-19 halted all in-person programming. For the next year we tried our best to facilitate online screenings and discussions, but of course, the energy was different and it was this new challenge to rally folks to watch films online at a time when the whole country was growing weary of watching films at home.

During this period, I reconnected with screenwriting and started submitting to screenwriting fellowships, something I’d never done before. To date, I’ve been privileged to participate in back-to-back fellowships that have strengthened my skills as a screenwriter and filmmaker and given me the gift of connecting with other indigenous and Pasifika filmmakers. 

a photo of many people at the LA Asian Pacific Film Festival

“Armed With a Camera” Fellowship cohort at the 2022
L.A. Asian Pacific Film Festival: (L-to-R) M. Kaleipumehana Cabral, Veialu Aila-Unsworth, Peter Filimaua, Alexis Si’i, Misa Tupou, and Lauren To’omalatai

This past year has been an incredible experience for me under Visual Communications “Armed With a Camera” Fellowship where I was given financial support and mentorship to direct my first short film “Snack”. This cohort was the first in AWC’s 20 year history to be entirely Pacific Islander which serves as a reminder that often in AAPI spaces or initiatives, the PI part of that acronym is minimized or forgotten completely.

Through this fellowship, some intercommunity healing has taken place and I’m hopeful we will continue to make strides in ensuring that when AAPI is used, it actually and actively includes Pacific Islanders in a meaningful way. Snack makes its world premiere at this year’s Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival and comes full circle to screen at this year’s Māsima on closing night. 

In 2021 I was a participant in the imagineNATIVE Screenwriting Intensive where I spent the following months writing my first feature film. This would also be the inaugural year of Māsima that saw the incredible staff from the Salt Lake Film Society help us orchestrate a virtual tour complete with panel discussions and partnering with local Pacific Islander owned businesses.

I chose the name Māsima, which means “salt” in a few Pasifika dialects, referencing Salt Lake City where it was created and the salt of the ocean that connects our Pacific Islands and stories. In 2022 Māsima’s program was a larger hybrid experience of both in-person and online screenings and thanks to the generosity of Bill Imada and his team at IW Group we took an abbreviated version of Māsima to Los Angeles. 

A photo of important people from opening night of Māsima 2022 at SLFS

Opening Night of the 2022 Māsima Pacific Islands Film Tour

Filmmaking is a collaborative effort. This goes for not only what happens on-set and on the production side of things, but also what happens when your film leaves you and is shared with others. There is a lot of trust and respect when a film is shared with an audience that we would all do well to remember and I’m extremely appreciative of each and every filmmaker who has allowed us to showcase their work in all iterations of Māsima. Salt Lake County has a large population of Pacific Islanders and it’s a dream fulfilled to share Pasifika stories with the local community for a third year at Broadway. 

There is an expression in Sāmoan, Teu le Vā, which means “nurture the space” and that space is essentially the relationships that we all have in our lives. This relationship could be one that you have with another person, multiple people, or the environment around you. This is a personal favorite saying of mine that I strive to live by because the relationships that we have with our family, friends, coworkers, ourselves, and the world around us, are crucial to the ways we see, experience, create, and share art. To be an artist is to be in community and we must prioritize these relationships so trust and creativity can take root and flourish. 

A still from a film showing two Pacific Islander women

Still image from Snack, starring Luseane Pasa and Vida
Tuitamaalelagi Hafoka

The relationship that I’ve had the honor of cultivating with the incredible team at the Salt Lake Film Society is one that I value greatly and I’m grateful to be working closely with an organization that doesn’t just purport to care about diverse stories but, has made an active effort to bring those stories and storytellers to the forefront. I hope Pasifika and non-Pasifika audiences alike will attend one of our screenings down at the Broadway to see the variety of humanity and creativity that the Pacific Islander community has. 

If you can’t make it to the Broadway in May during Māsima’s run or any of the available screenings online, here’s a curated list of Pasifika films that I believe have made waves of positive change and self-expression in the ever-expanding ocean that is Pasifika cinema.”

Here is a curated list from Lauren of Pacific Island films, available on SLFS Letterboxd and below.

Loimata: The Sweetest Tears (2022) directed by Anna Marbrook 

Waru (2017) directed by Ainsley Gardiner, Casey Kaa, Renae Maihi, Awanui Simich-Pene

For My Father’s Kingdom (2021) directed by Vea Mafileʻo 

Tanna (2015) directed by Martin Butler and Bentley Dean

Whale Rider (2002) directed by Niki Caro

The Dark Horse (2014) directed by James Napier Robertson

The Dead Lands (2014) directed by Toa Fraser

Cousins (2021) directed by Briar Grace-Smith and Ainsley Gardiner

Three Wise Cousins (2016) directed by Stallone Vaiaoga-Ioasa

Boy (2010) directed by Taika Waititi

Out of State (2017) directed by Ciara Lacy

Patu! (1983) directed by Merata Mita

Hunt for the Wilderpeople (2016) directed by Taika Waititi

The Orator (2011) directed by Tusi Tamasese

One Thousand Ropes (2016) directed by Tusi Tamasese

Once Were Warriors (1994) directed by Lee Tamahori

Next Goal Wins (2014) directed by Mike Brett, Steve Jamison

Waikiki (2020) directed by Christopher Kahunahana

James & Isey (2021) directed by Florian Habicht

Leitis in Waiting (2018) directed by Joe Wilson, Hinaleimoana Wong-Kalu, Dean Hamer

Every Day in Kaimuki (2022) directed by Alika Tengan

The Land Has Eyes (2004) directed by Vilsoni Hereniko

No. 2 (2007) directed by Toa Fraser

The Legend of Baron To’a (2020) directed by Kiel McNaughton

Merata: How Mum Decolonised the Screen (2018) directed by Hepi Mita

Kumu Hina (2014) directed by Joe Wilson and Dean Hamer 

Island Soldier (2017) directed by Nathan FItch

Ever the Land (2015) directed by Sarah Grohnert

Mele Murals (2015) directed by Tadashi Nakamura and Keoni Lee

Māsima: Pacific Islands Film Tour

Māsima: Pacific Islands Film Tour kicks off on Friday, May 17th, with an exciting lineup that highlights acclaimed filmmakers and emerging voices from the Pacific Islander community.

These films, touching on incredible stories of connection, traditions, resistance and much more, are curated and presented by Salt Lake Film Society, Utah Pacific Islands Knowledge 2 Action Resource and Utah Pacific Islands Film Series.

Māsima 2024 is part of our annual Cultural Tours, a decade long celebration of history, culture, diversity and heritage of Utah communities.

PANELS

Available Free May 17 - May 23

Māsima 2024 Panel Conversations: Guided by our amazing moderator, Kamaile Tripp-Harris, our Māsima 2024 panel conversations are a true celebration of Pacific Islanders diversity as well as educational experiences that help create awareness and cultural connections within Pasifika filmmakers all around the world.

These FREE pre-recorded panels will be available online soon. Available thru May 24.

Children of the Diaspora Shorts Program

Panelists:
Toa Takitini – Caitlin Head
Find Where I Belong – Kahu Kaiha
Teine – Giselle Ilaoa

Moderator: Kamaile Tripp

Join this group of three unapologetic filmmakers who discuss the fine balance between representing the diversity in Pasifika cultures and creating universally relatable films, while they remain authentic, honor their inspirations and confront their own believes and patterns.


Documentary Shorts Program

Panelists:
In Exile – Nathan Fitch
Islandtrification – Lani Cupchoy
Trenton: To The Moon & Back – Josh Leong
Ultimate Citizens – Francine Strickwerda

Moderator: Kamaile Tripp-Harris

A sneak peak on how these talented filmmakers engaged with such unique stories through the narrative of documentary and the challenges navigating representation, collaboration and community trust.

ADMISSIONS

INDIVIDUAL FILM TICKETS
$12 per film screening
 
PASSES
$60 All Access Pass includes access to all Māsima 2024 in person films and events.
 
All tickets and film passes are available at SLFStix.org.

FILM SCHEDULE

In theater screenings start Friday May 17.  Selected films are available virtually now.

Fri May 17

7 PM

Made in Utah Shorts Program: 

The Good Lie

9 min 13 sec

+

Pioneers of Aloha

11 min 11 sec

+

Adrift

4 min 57 sec

+

The Ali’i King

26 min 39 sec

Screening run time: 52 min.

8 PM

Cast and Crew Q&A

Sat May 18

7 PM

Documentaries Shorts Program:

Hounga’ia – Be Grateful

3 min 57 sec

+

Ultimate Citizens

39 min

+

Trenton: To The Moon & Back

17 min

+

Islandtrification

8 min 35 sec

+

In Exile 10 min

+

Kava ‘o Aotearoa

8 min 45 sec

+

Son of Samoa

11 min

Screening run time: 1 hr 38 min.

Sun May 19

7 PM

Children of the Diaspora Shorts Program:

Toa Takitini

11 min 53 sec

+

Teine

11 min

+

Find Where I Belong

13 min 43 sec

+

Hafekasi 

16 min

Screening run time: 52 min 36 sec

Mon May 20

7 PM

Feature in Focus:

Sir Sofele

1 hr 18 min

Screening run time: 1 hr 18 min.

Tues May 21

7 PM

History and Myths Program:

Kūkini

26 min 01 sec

+

Tala

51 min 45 sec

Screening run time: 1 hr 18 min.

Wed May 22

7 PM

Island Humor Shorts Program:

Jone Wise

22 min 27 sec

+

The Good Thief

4 min 58 sec

+

Ripe For Change

11 min 49 sec

7:40 PM

Pacific Possibilities Shorts Program:

Vakaraitaka

14 min 34 sec

+

Crying on the I-5

13 min 24 sec

+

Kai Hali’a (Sea of Memory)

8 min 30 sec 

Screening run time: 1 hr 17 min

Thurs May 23

7 PM

Feature in Focus:

Pacific Mother  

1 hr 30 min

Screening run time: 1 hr 30 min.

8:30 PM

In-person Panel Conversation

 

FILMS AND SHORTS

Listed alphabetical by title.  

ADRIFT

FRIDAY, MAY 17 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF MADE IN UTAH SHORTS PROGRAM ON FRIDAY MAY 17

5 min | 2023 | USA | Not Rated | English | Short
Directed by Kā’eo Drumright
After a late night out, a young Tongan man finds connection in an unexpected place.

CRYING ON THE I-5

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22 | 7:40 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF PACIFIC POSSIBILITIES PROGRAM ON WEDNESDAY MAY 22

13 min | 2024 | USA | Not Rated | English | Short

Directed by Jacob Cruz-Rine

After the death of his grandmother, a young Chamoru man ruminates on regrets he has, the relationship he had with his grandmother, and the love he has for his family.

FIND WHERE I BELONG

SUNDAY, MAY 19 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF CHILDREN OF THE DIASPORA SHORTS PROGRAM ON SUNDAY MAY 19

14 min | 2023 | New Zealand | Not Rated | English | Short

Directed by Kahu Kaiha

Life on the streets of New Zealand for two homeless men: John, the older man, seems to like this life and to be at home here. Elvis, the Marquesan, dreams of returning to his island. Good relations and understanding v. confrontation, separation and mutual aid…

HAFEKASI

SUNDAY, MAY 19 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF CHILDREN OF THE DIASPORA SHORTS PROGRAM ON SUNDAY MAY 19

16 min | 2023 | Australia | Not Rated | English, Tongan | Short

Directed by Annelise Hickey

A 10 year old girl begins to realise she’s different to her single, white mum and family. Mother and daughter navigate identity and belonging in ’90s Melbourne suburbia.

HOUNGA'IA - BE GRATEFUL

SATURDAY, MAY 18 | 7 PM
WILL SCREEN AS PART OF DOCUMENTARY SHORTS PROGRAM ON SATURDAY MAY 18
4 min | 2023 | New Zealand | Not Rated | Tongan | Short
Directed by Mele Tupou
It takes a village to raise a child, let alone one living with a disability. Mele show’s us how Haloti’s village wraps around him in support.

IN EXILE

SATURDAY, MAY 18 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF DOCUMENTARY SHORTS PROGRAM ON SATURDAY MAY 18

10 min | 2023 | USA | Not Rated | English, Marshallese | Short

Directed by Nathan Fitch

IN EXILE is a short film that explores the US nuclear legacy in the Pacific through the lens of members of the Marshallese community in Springdale Arkansas who gather each year to commemorate the bombing of Bikini Atoll in 1946.

ISLANDTRIFICATION

SATURDAY, MAY 18 | 7 PM
WILL SCREEN AS PART OF DOCUMENTARY SHORTS PROGRAM ON SATURDAY MAY 18

8 min | 2023 | USA | Not Rated | English | Short

Directed by Lani Cupchoy

Islandtrification documents the journey of Kānaka Maoli families resisting predatory gentrification on Maui, Hawaii, which has a deep history of displacing locals due to economic development-agribusiness and remains the prime spot for the world elite to build their multimillion-dollar estates.

JONE WISE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF ISLAND HUMOR PROGRAM ON WEDNESDAY MAY 22

22 min | 2023 | Fiji | Not Rated | English | Short

Directed by Tumeli Tuqota

When someone steals his precious flip flops, Jone Wise must return to his old ways of Grog Combat and battle his way through adversity, tribulation and high tide takis to retrieve what is rightfully his.

KAI HALI'A (SEA OF MEMORY)

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22 | 7:40 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF PACIFIC POSSIBILITIES PROGRAM ON WEDNESDAY MAY 22

8 min | 2023 | USA | Not Rated | English, Hawaiian | Short

Directed by Angelique Kalani Axelrode

In the abstract realm of memory, a diasporic Kānaka struggles to connect with their family and lover. By engaging with their moʻokūʻauhau (genealogy) and calling on their kūpuna (ancestors) and ke kai (ocean), they are able to reconnect to themselves. Seeing memory as an intricate ʻupena (net) of both intangible and tangible threads of reality, intertwined with visceral feelings that intimately connect us with our kūpuna (ancestors) and the ʻāina (land), the art of remembering brings us back to our core.

KAVA 'O AOTEAROA

SATURDAY, MAY 18 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF DOCUMENTARY SHORTS PROGRAM ON SATURDAY MAY 18

9 min | 2022 | New Zealand | Not Rated | English | Short

Directed by Joshua Baker

A collective of Pasifika cultural guardians reactivate the ancient Tu’i Tonga kava ceremony for contemporary use in Aotearoa-New Zealand in a way that honours tangata whenua (indigenous people).

KŪKINI

TUESDAY, MAY 21 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF HISTORY AND MYTHS PROGRAM ON TUESDAY MAY 21

26 min | 2023 | USA | Not Rated | Hawaiian(‘olelo Hawai‘i) | Short

Directed by Mitchel Merrick

In 1790 Hawaiʻi, an elite warrior must leave his family behind when sent on a deadly mission to report on the bloody war waged by Kamehameha against Maui. When captured by the enemy, he is miraculously saved by someone who has a message for him of their own.

PACIFIC MOTHER

THURSDAY, MAY 23 | 7:00 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF FEATURE FOCUS ON THURSDAY MAY 23

2023 | Hawai’i, New Zealand, Polynesia, Micronesia, Tahiti, Cook Islands, Okinawa | Not Rated | English, Hawaiian | Feature

Directed by Katherine McRae, Migawa Ozawa

When freedivers Sachiko Fukumoto and William Trubridge were denied the natural water-birth they wanted in Okinawa, they traveled to New Zealand where they were supported in their choice. Now Sachiko seeks out three other mothers around the Pacific and discovers they face similar battles and have been cut off from the maternity traditions of their past. Sachiko becomes convinced that when mothers are supported emotionally, physically and culturally, they are more likely to have a positive birth experience, wherever it takes place. Aware of the importance of the ocean in all aspects of their lives, these Pacific women link the protection of our oceans with the protection of their children and seek a future where we live in harmony with nature. As Sachiko and William prepare for the birth of their second child, they are determined to show their daughter that supporting parents’ birth choice grows healthier babies, families and communities.

PIONEERS OF ALOHA

FRIDAY, MAY 17 | 7 PM
WILL SCREEN AS PART OF MADE IN UTAH SHORTS PROGRAM ON FRIDAY MAY 17
11 min | 2024 | USA | Not Rated | English | Short
In Skull Valley, Utah, a former settlement of Hawaiian LDS pioneers stands preserved as a memorial and gathering place. The women of this community are dedicated to preserving its unique history and dispelling lingering myths. The land holds a captivating story, attracting Polynesian pioneers over a century ago and paving the way for a fast-growing community.

RIPE FOR CHANGE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF ISLAND HUMOR PROGRAM ON WEDNESDAY MAY 22

12 min | 2024 | Australia | Not Rated | English | Short

Directed by Alisha Joy Higgins

“In the quirky world of ‘Ripe for Change,’ a group of diverse individuals find themselves entangled in a series of bizarre body swaps after indulging in a mysterious fruit at a remote market stall. As they navigate this hilariously twisted dark comedy adventure, one of them becomes increasingly suspicious of whether this phenomenon is just a bizarre side effect of the weed they smoked earlier or something much fruitier. Fueled by curiosity and comedy, ‘Ripe for Change’ is a zany journey that unravels the mysteries behind these extraordinary body transformations and leaves the audience questioning the true cause.”

SIR SOFELE

MONDAY, MAY 20 | 7 PM

78 min | 2022 | Kingdom of Tonga | Not Rated | English, Tongan | Feature

Directed by Neka ‘Aipolo

Experience the story of the Polynesian composer knighted by Pope John Paul II in a feature length documentary that follows his life, music and the peoples impacted along the way.

SON OF SAMOA

SATURDAY, MAY 18 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF DOCUMENTARY SHORTS PROGRAM ON SATURDAY MAY 18

11 min | 2023 | New Zealand | Not Rated | English, Samoan | Short

Directed by Laman Time

Son of Samoa takes you through the journey of Tatau. Identity is explored in a way physically, spiritually and mentally that most have not endured. In this short documentary director Laman discusses his disconnection from family, community and wavering relationship with himself with supporting voices, Tamoko/Tufuga artist Inia Taylor, speaks on the importance of belonging and how to navigate that through cultural traditions. Bonni Tamati, a Pacific art advocate also expresses her love for self-discovery and how love within oneself can help spread love around you. This is a story of hope, a story shared for all, a story of self-love.

TALA

TUESDAY, MAY 21 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF HISTORY AND MYTHS PROGRAM ON TUESDAY MAY 21

51 min | 2022 | USA | Not Rated | English, Samoan | Feature

Directed by Milton Randell Kaka

A young samoan family has just found a new religion, the villages aren’t to pleased so a few men go to the family’s house and take the 5 month old baby. The family faces a tragedy which the mother struggles with for years. Years later the man responsible for taking baby Tala comes to ask for forgiveness from the family. Based on a true story.

TEINE

SUNDAY, MAY 19 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF CHILDREN OF THE DIASPORA SHORTS PROGRAM ON SUNDAY MAY 19

11 min | 2023 | New Zealand | Not Rated | English, Samoan | Short

Directed by Giselle Ilaoa

A poignant story of a dutiful eldest daughter within a Samoan household and her internal struggle of the weight of her responsibilities and expectations from her family, as well as, trying to maintain a grasp on her own aspirations in life.

THE ALI'I KING

FRIDAY, MAY 17 | 7 PM
WILL SCREEN AS PART OF MADE IN UTAH SHORTS PROGRAM ON FRIDAY MAY 17

26 min | 2024 | USA | Not Rated | English, German, Hawaiian(‘olelo Hawai‘i) | Short

Directed by Christine Kunewa Walker

Set in the 1960’s, a Mormon family of Hawaiian German immigrants embark on a road trip through the Utah desert to attend the opening of Tikiland, a new Disneyland attraction. Along the way, family tensions heat up as the road to “the happiest place on earth” leads to painful revelations about the cultural and emotional complexities that jeopardize the family dynamic.

THE GOOD LIE

FRIDAY, MAY 17 | 7 PM
WILL SCREEN AS PART OF MADE IN UTAH SHORTS PROGRAM ON FRIDAY MAY 17
9 min | 2023 | USA | Not Rated | English | Short
Directed by Aarron Reupena
A burglar stumbles upon a house with a dead body inside, but what seems to be an easy target soon turns into something much more meaningful.

THE GOOD THIEF

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF ISLAND HUMOR PROGRAM ON WEDNESDAY MAY 22

5 min | 2023 | New Zealand | Not Rated | English | Short

Directed by Marius Leituala

TOA TAKITINI

SUNDAY, MAY 19 | 7 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF CHILDREN OF THE DIASPORA SHORTS PROGRAM ON SUNDAY MAY 19

12 min | 2023 | New Zealand | Not Rated | English, Maori | Short

Directed by Caitlin Head

Two siblings find themselves in their fathers room a year after his drowning. Stuck there by Hine-nui-te-pō (the Goddess of Death), the two must face their traumas of his death, grief and mend their broken relationship.

TRENTON: TO THE MOON AND BACK

SATURDAY, MAY 18 | 7 PM
WILL SCREEN AS PART OF DOCUMENTARY SHORTS PROGRAM ON SATURDAY MAY 18

17 min | 2022 | USA | Not Rated | English | Short

Directed by Josh Leong

Two indigenous brothers from the Solomon Islands escape a cult posing as a leadership training organization, finding refuge in a small, conservative town in rural Georgia.

ULTIMATE CITIZENS

SATURDAY, MAY 18 | 7 PM
WILL SCREEN AS PART OF DOCUMENTARY SHORTS PROGRAM ON SATURDAY MAY 18

39 min | 2023 | USA | Not Rated | English | Short

Directed by Francine Strickwerda

In ULTIMATE CITIZENS, Jamshid is an Iranian who came to study in 1970’s America, and due to the Revolution, never went “home.” As a guidance counselor in Seattle Public Schools, Jamshid’s best work takes place out of the building and on a playing field with “his kids,” the children of refugees and immigrants. Their parents are in the grips of their own struggles to make a living and a home in a strange land. Mr. Jamshid is the charismatic, fiery, funny human with a Frisbee in hand, who is the first to show that “love wins” on the field, off the field, at home with family, or boldly forging a new community, in a new country – one kid, chicken, extreme mile and friend at a time.

VAKARAITAKA

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22 | 7:40 PM

WILL SCREEN AS PART OF PACIFIC POSSIBILITIES PROGRAM ON WEDNESDAY MAY 22

14 min | 2022 | Fiji | Not Rated | English | Short

Directed by Fenton Bose Lutunatabua

The recent swells of climate activism in the Pacific are inherently linked with the deep connections of past and future generations. Rising up to physical and existential struggles requires tapping into ancestral wisdom that can further strengthen our existing bonds with one another. In this four-part cinematic poem, Fijian storyteller Fenton Lutunatabua utilizes landscape, dance, and language to call people into this work, as well as offer a balm to the losses faced.

Music May starts May 5

Join us at SLFS in May 2023 for our Music May retrospective series is curated by musician John Doe from the band “X” every weekend on Fridays and Saturdays starting May 5.

John Doe is a founding member of the legendary punk rock band X, who released ALPHABETLAND in April 2020. His eleventh solo record, Fables in a Foreign Land (Fat Possum Records) was released in May of 2022.  He has appeared in over 60 films and television productions, some of his most notable roles have been in Road House, Georgia, Roadside Prophets, Great Balls of Fire, Pure Country and Roswell. His most recent film effort is playing the lead, Frank Bigelow, in a period correct, re-imagined version of the film noir, D.O.A. So far it has won several film festival awards including Best Picture & Best Actor. He currently lives in Austin, Texas.

Showtimes may vary. Tickets will be on sale at www.slfstix.org.

MAY 5: CHULAS FROTERAS

MAY 6: X: THE UNHEARD MUSIC

MAY 12: I’M NOT HERE

MAY 13: BIRD (1988)

MAY 19: BLACK ORPHEUS

MAY 20: SEARCHING FOR SUGARMAN

MAY 26: THE GIRL CAN’T HELP IT

MAY 27: THE HARDER THEY COME